Garden Art with a Garden Trellis Made from Farm Tools

Garden Art with a Garden Trellis Made from Farm Tools

This project started out when I thrifted several old garden shovels for a Halloween project. Well, try as I might, the spooky project was a failure. I let the dust of my frustration settle before going back to the drawing board- I had the farm tools after all- I just needed a new idea! Eventually, I settled on the idea of building a garden trellis that would serve as garden art and primitive decor for my yard.

*****

*****

First, I found this garden spade…

Garden spade or shovel to be upcycled into a garden trellis to use as garden art and primitive decor by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

And then I found a garden fork or two at another thrift store…

Garden fork or rake at thrift store for upcycling into diy garden trellis to use as garden art by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

My garden trellis idea seemed simple enough. I had the farm tools and I just needed to connect them together and stick in the ground, right? This post contains affiliate links for your crafting convenience.

Building a Garden Trellis for Garden Art

Now that I had the farm tools in hand, I needed some scrap wood for the cross slats that would both connect the tools and provide more surface area for plants to climb onto. So, I headed to Habitat ReStore for some wood trim that would do the job and cost very little.

Garden trellis idea using farm tools and scrap wood to use as primitive decor and garden art by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

Before actually building the garden trellis, I figured that the handles of the farm tools would go into the ground far more easily if the ends were tapered like a stake. So, we used our vintage drawknife to shave off the ends of each handle- just enough to be more stake-like (a chisel would work, too).

Using a drawknife to chisel ends of garden tool handles to stick in the ground when upcycled into garden trellis by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

Now, all we needed to do was attach our wood trim to the backs of our farm tools like lattice. Easy-peasy, right? We laid out the tools and sawed the trim down to size- three pieces, progressively shorter in length.

First, we tried screws with the drill…but the drill (no matter the setting AND using pilot holes) torqued the screws in half. Those garden tool handles are dense as all get out.

Then we tried hammer and nails- which worked, but we nearly split the wood trim pieces with the force needed to get the nails into the tool handles.

Attaching scrap wood to garden fork for garden trellis idea using farm tools with garden spade by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

Successful, but with a hefty side of aggravation, we hammered in three nails through the back of the top (longest) piece of wood trim. To add insurance, I wrapped jute twine around each connection/joint, as tightly as possible. I actually liked how it looked on my garden art, so that was just a bonus.

Building a garden trellis using farm tools and scrap wood to use as garden art or primitive decor by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

But we still had 6 nails to pound in! And the wood trim pieces just didn’t look like they could handle it.

So, shhhh…I used wood glue for the middle and lower pieces of trim. I clamped the trim to the handles, let the glue set for 24 hours, and then I wound the twine around each connection again. Maybe the easy way out, but I’m building a garden trellis…not a ladder to climb on or something!

Attaching garden spade and garden fork together for garden trellis using scrap wood and jute twine by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

In hindsight, perhaps a nail gun would have been the best solution. But I didn’t own one at the time and as excited as I was about building a garden trellis, I didn’t want to go out and buy one at the time.

Garden Art and Primitive Decor with a Garden Trellis

And there it is- all frustrations are in our rearview mirror now, so I can enjoy that the garden trellis turned out beautifully! You’ll notice that our center tool “stake” is much longer- on purpose. It will act like a tap root on a tree, and the side “stakes” will act like training wheels. I highly recommend this tip!

Garden trellis built from garden fork and garden spade found at thrift store to use as primitive decor or lawn decoration by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

The big test- sticking the garden trellis in the ground! But ta-da, it worked like a charm (at least in our rain-drenched soil).

I love that it acts as primitive decor and garden art, but still functions as a garden trellis for whatever plant we place it by. And the farm tools that we used like a garden spade and garden fork were really perfect for it. And you can almost ALWAYS find those lurking in the corners of thrift stores.

And if you’re looking for more upcycled and repurposed Yard & Garden ideas, I hope you’ll check out my full collection here!

Craft on!

S

Want to be notified when I publish my next upcycling project tutorial?

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


Join me on Social Media:




PIN ME!How to Make a Garden Trellis from Farm Tools that serves as Garden Art and Primitive Decor by Sadie Seasongoods / www.sadieseasongoods.com

Comments

  1. I have some garden tools that were my grandfather’s that I was considering getting rid of since I didn’t need them. I guess I will be keeping them for now. . .

  2. You are too creative. I can’t handle it! 😀

  3. That is really awesome. Wonderful and cute. Thank you for sharing.

  4. If you will use a drill and drill bit to make a pilot hole before you try to put in a screw or even a nail in hard wood you won’t have to worry about splitting the wood. Makes it much easier.

  5. Such a great trellis idea! Might make one for my garden.

  6. Your so creative! Love it! Will have to keep my eyes open for some old garden tools, I have just the place for one of these. Thanks for sharing! Pinning!

  7. Such a clever idea and what a feature for your garden! Have pinned and shared and will be having a go in making one out of some of my dad’s old garden tools 🙂

  8. Oh, I love this idea! You did such a great job and its so fun and unique.

  9. Oh my gosh what a great use of garden tools! And perfect for repurposing old ones. I think I could actually do this. Thank you so much for sharing

  10. Super cute Sarah! After a bit of frustration, it turned out great. I have everything to make one next Spring. Surprisingly, screws would probably go in a lot easier than nails. Thanks for sharing the how to’s with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

  11. SWEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEET!! Many thanks for linking up at Vintage Charm!

  12. oh my gosh, this is so cool! Love it, but don’t love the work that seems to have to go into it.

  13. I love this! It is too cute!! I was just wondering how I am going to fix my broken down trellis that got destroyed by this crazy wind storm and weather we are having. It has about 3 years worth of a clematis on it so I think I will just tie a garden tool to it to hold it all up! I see those vintage tools all the time but pass them by, not knowing what to do with them. Now I do! Thanks for a great idea.

  14. What a fun idea and a nice way to upcycle! It looks great!

  15. Such a clever idea! I think I may do a mini version of this for a table setting. Pinning this to one of my boards.

  16. This is the cutest idea ever, and I think I may need to use this idea for my rose bush out front this spring. Love it!

    • It looks so cute, right? Someone else commented that they’re going to make miniature versions as placecard holders- now THAT might be the cutest version…just far less practical for me (since I never entertain). 🙂

  17. What a great idea for a trellis! Pinned it.

  18. This project was well worth the frustration. I love your vintage tool trellis. Thank you for sharing at Vintage Charm!

  19. Oh my gosh…this is such a cute idea! 🙂

    Thanks for joining Cooking and Crafting with J & J. Happy Thanksgiving!

  20. So cool!!! I’ve pinned! 🙂

  21. Oh I love this. What a great creative idea! I’m glad you linked at Share a Cup.
    Today I featured Jan’s party at my blog. Come over and comment on her feature post to enter Jan in a giveaway!
    It’s nice meeting you!

  22. What a fun and unique way to use old garden/farm tools. Definitely a conversation starter.

  23. What a clever idea! I love giving new life to items that might otherwise end up in the trash.

  24. That looks really great. But, and it’s a BIG SAFETY BUT, be very carefull those tines on the hay fork don’t cause an injury to people whose face is at about the same height as the fork.
    A really nice project that should last for years, well done you.

  25. Jennifer Thompson says

    Oh my goodness! This is so clever and creative — I love it!!!

  26. Great Idea but I would ad a 2 foot piece of Re-bar at the base (one foot connected to the handle the other foot to stick into the ground ) so the Handles just barely hit the ground since Wood Rots fast in the ground.

  27. Naomie Moore says

    Too cool! Great idea, I have some extra tools and am going to gibe this a try. Will be great for my green beans! And will last longer too. Thanks for sharing!

  28. That is one awesome idea……..kudos! !!

  29. A crafter’s dream: Create something new from something old, inexpensive, functional, fantastic, and beautiful. You’ve hit all the marks.

    I’ve always said, “I’m not an artist”. However, I am very good at playgerism. You can bet I will be playing with this idea.

  30. Leslie George says

    LOVE this, what a great idea 🙂 I have a thing for old pitchforks for some reason lol maybe they remind me of the horses I used to have. Thank you for sharing

  31. Hi
    this is not related to your post but can you please tell me in the second picture from the top (the picture labeled ” This is the shovel that started it all! “) , infront of the shovel , what is that metal rack with 4 small wood balls ?, I received one but i do not what it is , its looks to me like somekind of cd rack . Thank you for your help ad time

  32. Sandra Crosbie says

    That is so clever and cool. Great idea.

  33. The very first picture made me smile. That is so cute! What a great idea. And the trellises in the stores are so cheaply made and flimsy. Your creativity is a true gift from God! Thanks for sharing!

  34. I had to laugh. In your very 1st picture, there is a cd holder. I bought exactly like that one at a yard sale and it is now a trellis for a small vine on my front porch.

  35. Love it, Love it, Love it!!! What a cute and creative way to use up those yard tools! I give you lots of credit on drilling and hammering the nails, only to find that glue was the solution! Been there, done that, so I know your frustrations! Even if I have to thrift or buy them, I will certainly be making this project! Thank you so much for such a cute and creative post!

  36. cynthia cross says

    I made a bunch of these about 10 years ago to sell. they are not as easy as they look!!! (as is often the case, when you’re good at something you make it look easier than it is. I believe we had to make a jig to drill them. we no longer make them, but they are still cute.

  37. If you had drilled pilot holes before you put a screw in that would have worked great! I like using screws because I don’t have the strength to drive in a nail. Darling idea, keep them coming!

  38. That is adorable!! I always find broken tools and now I know what I can do with them! Pinned to try! 🙂

  39. This is so cool! You’re a smart girl.

    Happy Thoughts of Home. We appreciate you sharing your time and talent with us. 🙂

  40. This is so cool and so creative. I love anything repurposed so this really got my attention.

  41. Very clever idea and has way more character than the store bought variety! Pinned

  42. Such a cute trellis! Your thrifted tools became yard art. I really like the decorative effect of the added jute twine, too.
    Carol (“Mimi”) from Home with Mimi

  43. That is adorable! What a fun idea and great way to reuse things that can’t be used for their normal purpose any more. I love it!

  44. acraftymix says

    I love, love, love this idea Sarah. We have tons of old rusty garden tools in the shed that would be just perfect for this.

  45. what a truly unique idea! you don’t see that everyday in blogland!
    b

  46. Very clever, excellent repurposed trellis idea!! #MerryMonday

  47. What a fabulous repurposed trellis! Thanks for sharing @Vintage Charm!

  48. Sarah, you know that I lo-ooove this trellis. Not only does it use repurposed items, but it’s so stinkin’ cute and practical, too. That’s a win-win-win. Thanks for sharing at the This Is How We Roll Link Party.

  49. Oh you know I love this!!!!!!!!!!!!

Trackbacks

  1. […] Virginia, I think you’d better be prepared to get really strange stuff from hereon out. Because this adorable winter scene has proven your friend is right! Garden Trellis from Vintage Yard Tools by Sadie Seasongoods […]

  2. […] I had plenty of random scrap trim leftover from my garden trellis project…including this piece that even had the same shape as a Scrabble tile […]

  3. […] set of old yard tools can easily be upcycled into a rustic garden […]

  4. […] Seasongoods put together this amazing DIY Garden Trellis using old garden tools. What a great […]

  5. […] DIY Garden Trellis | Sadie Seasongoods […]

  6. […] Yard Tool Trellis- Sadies Seasongoods | Chalkboard Menu- Domestic Deadline […]

  7. […] DIY Garden Trellis using Repurposed Vintage Yard Tools| Sadie Seasongoods […]

  8. […] DIY Garden Trellis from Vintage Farm Tools| Sadie Seasongoods […]

  9. […] Trellis from Garden Tools is an eye-catching way to not only recycle a few old garden tools but to give those climbing roses […]

  10. […] I had plenty of random scrap trim leftover from my garden trellis project…including this piece that even had the same shape as a Scrabble tile […]

Have a question or like what you see? Please let me know!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.